Mystrenghtpc3 Mystrengthpc2 D1


A reader writes:

Sorry, but the first two readers you quote here just don’t get it. There is a world of difference between warning pedestrians to be careful when they cross the street or warning drivers not to leave their keys in their car and, once again, warning women not to “let” themselves get raped. Police don’t refuse to arrest drunk drivers or car thieves because the victim was dumb or just not careful. Prosecutors don’t decline to prosecute them for those reasons. Victims of drunk driving or car thefts are not ostracized in their communities or schools for acting like stupid sluts and trying to get otherwise nice boys in trouble. The reason victims of rape don’t see justice, and often are in fact penalized for coming forward, is because of these antiquated attitudes that the victim asked for it and therefore it was not a crime.

Another differs:

I don’t like either of the last two reader emails attacking the ad. The ad isn’t saying don’t drink and the possibility of rape is zero; it just says the girl in the ad wasn’t coherent enough to make her intentions known. It’s simply pointing out that you’re better off not getting so drunk that you can’t even put up the civilized, easy barrier of the word “no” in some implied party-like situation. That’s it.

So the last reader isn’t offering some solution with new wording: “She tried to stop him, but was too drunk to move”.  So now we should say she couldn’t fight the rapist off and that’s what she should be doing? Again, the simplicity is the ability to say “no”.

As the father of a young girl, I certainly want to get the message to boys and men that rape is a terrible crime and you are a criminal if you do it, there is no excuse, and more. However, if I can convince my daughter that at least keeping her wits about her at a party with alcohol so she can say “no” when necessary, I think she has a greater chance of not being the victim of a crime.

Another:

In response to your reader who asks, “Where are the ads telling boys DON’T RAPE or you’ll go to JAIL?” The California Department of Health Services and the California Coalition Against Sexual Assault has launched the MyStrength campaign. The campaign has a series of statements that begin with “My strength is not for hurting.” One poster says “My strength is not for hurting.  So when she was too drunk to decide, I decided we shouldn’t.” From their vision statement:

Our vision is a world free from sexual violence. To help make this vision a reality, we’re initiating “The MyStrength Campaign” to enlist to young men to take action to stop rape. The campaign centers on the theme of “My Strength is Not for Hurting,” and is designed to raise awareness of sexual violence among youth and highlight the vital role that young men can play in fostering healthy, safe relationships.

It may not include threats of jail, but I think this may be much more effective in changing behavior and teaching young men personal responsibility than the prospect of jail time.

Three posters from that ad campaign are seen above. A fourth was sent to Fail Blog:

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Caption:

Submitted by Haverford, who writes “This was on an anti-rape poster. The original said ‘My strength is not for hurting, so when she was drunk I backed off.’”