“Europeans” Are Not A People

Jan 6 2012 @ 8:47pm

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Gareth Harding expands on a point the Dish has been making:

The European Union was built on the myth that we are one people with one common destiny — an "ever closer union," in the words of the 1957 Treaty of Rome that founded what was then called the European Economic Community. We are now discovering that regional and national differences are not dissolving and that Europeans think and act very differently from one another. The British view of the state's role is very different from the French view. The Greek or Italian concept of law is very different from that of Sweden or Denmark. Latvians have a very different view of Russia from Germans. What an Irishman is prepared to pay in taxes is very different from what a Dane or Belgian will allow.

This lack of unity is Europe's third and most profound crisis, one that underlies the continent's economic and political woes. Most Europeans have little idea what the EU stands for in the world, what binds its people together, where it has come from in the past, and where it is going in the future. After more than 60 years of EU integration, 200,000 pages of legislation, and a hefty (and still growing) stack of treaties, we have succeeded in building a European Union without Europeans.

(Photo: A self-made euro sign is attached to the tip of a christmas tree in front of the European Central Bank [ECB] in Frankfurt am Main, western Germany, on December 21, 2011. By Boris Roessler/AFP/Getty Images.)