Santorum Wins Catholic Votes!

Yay, but only in the South: 

What most impressed me about the Louisiana event was how declining interest in the nominating contest produced a primary electorate sufficiently rarefied as to produce a fantasyland for Santorum. Half of those participating in the primary defined themselves as "very conservative." Half called themselves "strong supporters" of the Tea Party. Three-fourths were over the age of 45. Two-thirds claim to attend worship services every week. 

Indeed, Romney lost every demographic in the state, except among voters making more than $200,000 per year. Aaron Blake looks ahead

Next month’s contests will take place almost totally in the Northeast — a region where Romney is thus far undefeated. In addition, a few of those states award their delegates on a winner-take-all basis — something only two states have done so far — allowing Romney to expand his delegate lead more quickly than he has to this point. He leads by about 300 delegates overall, and that won’t change much based on Saturday’s results, because only 20 of Louisiana’s 46 delegates were at stake, and they will likely be split between Santorum and Romney. Santorum may get a little momentum off his win — as the media continue to question Romney’s appeal to conservatives — but Louisiana is one of the last states that will put a magnifying glass on that problem.