Did The Internet Kill Boredom?

Apr 15 2012 @ 8:26pm

Street_art_icy_sot_iran_20

by Zoë Pollock

Clay Shirky wonders:

I remember, as a child, being bored. I grew up in a particularly boring place and so I was bored pretty frequently. But when the Internet came along it was like, “That’s it for being bored! Thank God! You’re awake at four in the morning? So are thousands of other people!” It was only later that I realized the value of being bored was actually pretty high.

Being bored is a kind of diagnostic for the gap between what you might be interested in and your current environment. But now it is an act of significant discipline to say, “I’m going to stare out the window. I’m going to schedule some time to stare out the window.”

Nicholas Carr nods:

The pain of boredom is a spur to action, but because it's pain we're happy to avoid it. Gadgetry means never having to feel that pain, or that spur. The web expands to fill all boredom. That's dangerous for everyone, but particularly so for kids, who, without boredom's spur, may never discover what in themselves or in their surroundings is most deeply engaging to them.

(Image by ICY and SOT in Iran via Street Art Utopia)