Anne Stringfield reports on efforts to defeat the amendment:

The [Coalition to Protect North Carolina Families, an organization formed to fight the amendment] has targeted exactly the voters who those opposing gay rights have counted on most in past campaigns: religious communities. One of the Coalition’s first hires was a director of faith outreach, and so far, more than four hundred bishops, ministers, rabbis, and so forth have signed on as “people of faith against Amendment One.” Many have made videos or issued statements explaining why they’ve made this decision. In addition to the expected fund- and consciousness-raising events around the state (parties, art exhibits, beer tastings), sermons and Bible study groups have become part of the anti-amendment conversation.

The Coalition is also targeting African-Americans, with the help of the NAACP. Weigel looks at the poll numbers:

[A]ccording to PPP only 54 percent of Democrats oppose Amendment One. Only 43 percent of black voters oppose it. The end of the GOP presidential primary has made it easier for liberals to get to 50.1 percent against the amendment, sure. But if you apply the poll preferences to turnout so far, you still watch the Amendment pass. 

Earlier commentary on the amendment here and here.