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A quote for the day:

“Growing out of my work as a Professor of Christian Ethics at Yale University Divinity School, this book was designed to help people, especially Christians but also others, to think through their questions about human sexuality. It suggests the importance of moving from what frequently functions as a taboo morality to a morality and sexual ethics based on the discernment of what counts as wise, truthful, and recognizably just loves. Although my responses to some particular sexual ethical questions do depart from some traditional Christian responses, I have tried to show that they nonetheless reflect a deep coherence with the central aims and insights of these theological and moral traditions … This is what my book, Just Love, is about," – Sister Margaret A. Farley, R.S.M, whose book, Just Love has just been deemed non-kosher by the Vatican's orthodoxy arm, the CDF.

A review here. Farley's intellectual biography is truly impressive (which is, perhaps, why the old men in the Vatican, who want dumb but obedient priests, have just designated her book on the proscribed list):

“A Sister of Mercy, Farley was the first woman appointed to serve full-time on the YDS faculty and shared with Henri Nouwen the distinction of being the first Roman Catholic faculty member at the Divinity School. She is widely published and the recipient of the John Courtney Murray Award from the Catholic Theological Society of America. She has served as president of both the Catholic Theological Society of America and the Society of Christian Ethics. Respected not only as a scholar but as a teacher as well, she appeared on the cover of the Yale Alumni Magazine in 1986 in connection with a feature article on great teachers. She began teaching at Yale Divinity School in 1971 and earned her Ph.D. from the University in 1973.” She retired as professor emerita in 2007.

Fittingly Catholic, I would say, that a gay man and a brilliant woman should have pioneered study of Catholicism at Yale. And fittingly Catholic that the hierarchy would want to distance itself.