April Fulton surveys it:

In a fair taste test between seeded and seedless watermelons picked fresh from a field, "the triploids always win," [NC State's Todd Wehner] says. The triploids — the seedless ones — have three sets of genes instead of two, so any genes that affect sweetness, flavor, and texture are more likely to be expressed. And, he adds, some people prefer the caramel flavor of the Sugar baby variety, while others like the straight watermelon flavor of Crimson sweets. So the definition of "sweet" is variable.

"Think about where we started back in 6,000 years ago," Wehner says. "Watermelons came from southern Africa – they were white, hard, late maturing, low-yielding, and full of seeds." While the supermarket may only have one or two varieties of the red seedless ones these days, seed catalogs and farmers' markets offer dozens more.

I feel an experiment coming on.

Enjoy the one above.