In addition to the Obama ad we featured earlier, Bill Clinton is also appearing in this new RNC web video repeating the (false) welfare rhetoric:

Nate Cohn analyzes the GOP's strategy regarding these continued welfare attacks:

The welfare advertisements represent a marked shift in Romney's strategy. Rather than reinforcing existing perceptions of Obama, the Romney campaign is trying to introduce new information about the president to critical white working class voters. Realistically, Romney's chances hinge more on building up his own image than bolstering Obama's negatives, but if the Romney campaign just doesn't possess any tools to restore their candidate's image, then an attack targeted at swing voters and drawing on powerful underlying sentiments is probably their next best option. Whether Romney's welfare angle works without sustained media attention remains to be seen.

Regarding yesterday's Obama ad hitting Romney/Ryan on education, it's been called misleading by CNN and others, but Yglesias does a better job explaining:

The [ad] levels two accurate accusations against Mitt Romney. One is that Romney has said class size reduction policies aren't a good way of improving school outcomes, and the second is that the House GOP budget that Romney supports implies huge cuts in federal education spending: On the latter point, I have no real complaint. Romney's put out a K-12 education plan that contains some interesting ideas and some problematic ones but the big story really is that his budget won't leave much money for anything. But on class size while Obama's claim is perfectly true, it's a strange allegation to level in light of the fact that Education Secretary Arne Duncan believes the same thing.

In outside spending news, pro-Obama Super PAC Priorities USA's Romney-cancer ad may have blown up in their face: the ad the Romney campaign released in response to P-USA's attacks was apparently a hit with swing-voters:

[A new study by Vanderbilt University] found that Romney's "America Deserves Better" commercial was resonating with swing voters, moving "pure independents" who remained undecided some 6 percentage points in the Republican's favor. The researchers said this was the first ad of the campaign cycle they had studied that resonated with true swing voters.

Meanwhile Karl Rove's Super "non-profit issues" PAC, Crossroads GPS, is sinking $4.2 million into four states including their first forray into Florida. (They are focusing on the "issue" of there potentially being too many Democrats in the Senate.) Here's their TV ad targeting Senator Bill Nelson (D-FL):

And lastly, in pre-convention news, the DNC launched a pre-emptive pop-up video against former Democrat and RNC keynoter Artur Davis:

Ad War archive here.