Wedding Readings In The Age Of Pinterest

Lydia Kiesling scoured her favorite poetry, fiction, and even Louis C.K. riffs for an original take on love and marriage to use for her nuptials. Why she found it so difficult:

As a bookish person, it felt like cheating to be searching for beautiful passages from the Internet. I preferred for it to happen more organically (so precious, so mistaken). I read books all the time, I thought to myself; surely I should have some interior commonplace book chock-full of beauty and inspiration to consult. But the only two poems I can recite in their entirety — Philip Larkin’s "High Windows" and "This be the Verse" — are so far from wedding-worthy it’s hard to imagine anything worse: "When I see a couple of kids/ And guess he’s fucking her and she’s/ Taking pills or wearing a diaphragm,/ I know this is paradise." (or "They fuck you up, your mum and dad," obviously.)

What did she end up choosing?

…with several days remaining until the wedding I picked Collins’s "Litany" ("You are the bread and the knife,/ the crystal goblet and the wine"), which I thought was lovely and romantic and yet also conveyed the promised prosaic qualities of long relationships. It’s funny, but not too much. I find the long dashes of the last lines poignant: "You will always be the bread and the knife,/ not to mention the crystal goblet and — somehow –/ the wine."  There is an element of the sacramental which appeals to me, something that begins to approach the reverence I feel for my own beloved.