At least according to this debt-focused ad from Romney (size/scope of buy unknown):

The campaign also put out two coal-focused ads, likely for Ohio and Virginia, the states with the most coal workers. One is testimonial focused, the other blends testimonial with footage from a Romney rally at a coal mine (ad buy unknown):

Phillip Bumps points out a few problems, however:

The Beallsville[, OH] rally [seen in the video], you may remember, is the one at which miners were told that attendance was mandatory — and they were docked a day’s pay for the privilege of showing up. That’s right: Mitt Romney’s ad touting his deep, abiding love of the coal industry appears to feature miners who were made to attend by their boss and who did so at the cost of a day’s salary.

We’ll note that the content of the ad, the "war on coal," is itself a complete myth. The number of jobs in coal has expanded under President Obama. The primary enemy of the domestic coal industry is natural gas — now the dominant energy source for power production.

While pro-Obama Super PAC Priorities USA is out with the 47%-related ad that we featured earlier, its pro-Romney Super PAC counterpart, Restore Our Future, released a new TV ad that explains why last month's jobs report is even worse than it appears (ad buy unknown):

The ad will run in Michigan and Wisconsin. Speaking of the cheese state, here is a goggled Paul Ryan defending his congressional seat (Ryan has a total $5.4 million in his coffers for the race):

Elsewhere, the RNC is joining the united front trying to change the subject from Romney's fundraiser comments to Obama's redistribution line. And there is apparently a Rubio-starring Romney ad up in Florida (which hasn't been put online yet), as well as a new ad from dark money group Secure America Now, which is spending at least $400K to launch a thinly-veiled attack against Obama that stars the Israeli prime minister:

Another dark money GOP group, American Future Fund, is spending $670K across two congressional races, one in Arizona and the other in Missouri. Here is a pretty vicious ad attacking Democrat Kyrsten Sinema in Arizona ($420K buy): 

Lastly, Andrew Cohen flags "the best political ad of the season," from Congressman Ed Perlmutter (D-CO): 

Sometimes, you see an ad that simply, and eloquently, captures one of the ways that elected officials do help their constituents, directly, on both a human and an official level, in a manner that neither the constituent nor the official are ever likely to forget.

Decide for yourself:

Ad War archive here.