Mooney argues that fighting climate change is a winning issue:

In a survey of 1,204 likely voters in May 2012,  [Strategic Research pollster Andrew] Maxfield found that a "clean energy" candidate fared better than an "all-of-the-above" candidate who supported a variety of energy choices—coal, drilling, and also clean energy. Maxfield then went on to test a variety of climate messages—and the upshot, he says, is that "if you feel strongly about climate change, there is a way to talk about it that voters will understand and appreciate"—especially if candidates focus on recent extreme weather. "I was surprised at the strength of that, and the extent to which voters had begun to recognize the severe weather, and experience it," Maxfield says.

Drum is skeptical:

The problem is that you don't always get to talk about political issues the way you want to. Your opponents get to talk about them too. And they won't be shy about labeling virtually any serious green policy as a price hike for consumers and a regulatory burden for business. What's more, conservatives have an unusual advantage when they say this: it's actually true. Things like carbon taxes and cap-and-trade policies really will increase the price of energy for consumers. That's the whole point.