Screen shot 2012-10-17 at 7.18.45 PM

God fuck you all, as Hillary Clinton was once said to have said. On a more positive note, Urtak's Marc Lizoain breaks down the results of our reader-driven poll, which received almost 300,000 responses from nearly 10,000 participants on 67 approved questions:

After the first debate, 82% of respondents thought that Romney had won the debate. Today, an astonishing 98% thought that Obama had won the second. 98% is simply colossal. It is nearly impossible to get any group of any size to be that united about anything. 98% is the percentage of people who like ice cream, sunny days, and babies’ smiles. It’s the percentage of the vote that Saddam Hussein used to win in Iraqi presidential elections. A total reversal.

That’s definitely good news for President Obama, and good news for the heavily Democratic-leaning Dish readers, 74% of whom declare themselves to be "bloody elated." However, while another 98% declared themselves pleased with the outcome, just 47% of those people were willing to forgive Sullivan his trespass of two weeks ago, and call his response to the disaster of the first debate "appropriate." And of those who did not find the response appropriate, a huffy 39% stopped reading the blog entirely! But just how that group of people who abandoned the Dish happened across today’s Urtak must forever remain a mystery…

Read the rest of Marc's analysis here. See the full results for yourself here. Below are all the reader questions that focus on how to improve the debate format. Some interesting suggestions:

Do you think it was appropriate for Crowley to fact-check Romney during the debate? 95% said Yes

Should the next debate include a panel of live fact-checkers? 63% said Yes

Would it have improved the debate if the questioners had each been allowed a brief comment on the answers they received? 56% said Yes

Should the moderator have the ability to mute the microphone of a candidate who is running over time? 51% said Yes

Would you like to see rule infractions flashed on the screen (e.g. no asking direct questions candidate to candidate)? 28% said Yes

Should there be a "polygraph debate" format, where the opponents are literally connected to a polygraph? 17% said Yes