Ann Friedman puts the gains of female politicians in perspective:

[T]o achieve gender parity in Congress and secure women’s rights more broadly, every year has to be a Year of the Woman. And not just in the campaign headlines, but on Inauguration Day. Women have to make steady gains not just at the upper echelons of government, but in the state legislatures where candidates are groomed for higher office. Looking further down the pipeline, it’s hard to see how we get to a legitimate Year of the Woman anytime soon. Nine out of every ten states has a male governor, and women’s representation in state legislatures has been stagnant since 2007, a year that [Women’s Campaign Fund president Sam] Bennett calls a "veritable bloodbath."

That doesn’t bode well. Candidates like Elizabeth Warren, who began her political career on the national stage, are rare. Nearly every woman elected to Congress last night has served in her state legislature.