Income_Education_Demographics

Charles Murray reframes the discussion:

It’s not just that the income, occupations, and marital status of Asians should push them toward the right. Everyday observation of Asians around the world reveal them to be conspicuously entrepreneurial, industrious, family-oriented, and self-reliant. If you’re looking for a natural Republican constituency, Asians should define “natural.”

Murray ultimately answers that Asians vote overwhelming for Democrats because they see Republicans as "as the party of Bible-thumping, anti-gay, anti-abortion creationists," a characterization he deems "ludicrously inaccurate." Weigel counters:

If I'm a non-Latino white conservative in West Virginia or Kentucky or Arkansas, it's clear that the GOP best reflects my social values. And so I voted for the party this month, powering it to big gains in my state. You could view the "why X group votes Y way" debate this way — why do whites vote for the party that best represents them on a range of issues? Instead, Murray treats whites as the logic-based control group, and asks why non-whites don't approach the vote quite as logically.

Richard Posner argues that culture is a key factor:

If voting is thought of in expressive terms, it becomes possible to understand why Asian Americans should have favored Obama so decisively…. [T]he strongest support for the Republican Party is now found in the southern states (a striking historical reversal), especially in suburban or rural areas, and it is easy to see how Asian Americans, who are concentrated on the East and West Coasts and in cities, might tend to find Southerners culturally alien. 

(Chart from (pdf) Pew)