Forest Therapy, Ctd

Jan 5 2013 @ 8:12am

New research in the US supports the case for nature's cognitive benefits:

David Strayer, a professor of cognition and neural science at the University of Utah, Forest-park noticed that his brain felt more limber, his thoughts more fluid, on backcountry trips in the Southwest than they did in the lab. His undergraduates reported a similar mental boost, as did his colleagues. The peripatetic life seemed ideal for thinking about thinking.

Strayer began to organize yearly camping trips for his fellow neuroscientists. In 2010, Ruth Ann and Paul Atchley, a wife-and-husband team of psychologists from the University of Kansas, joined him on a weeklong trek through Utah’s Grand Gulch. Ruth Ann asked the group to complete the [wordplay "remote associates test," or RAT] before hitting the trail, and again a few days into the 32-mile hike. "It worked really, really well," Strayer says. "We had about a 45 percent improvement. So we said, ‘This seems to be perfect. It’s cheap, and it produces a nice big effect.'"

(Photo of Freya and Ralph Bodenner in Forest Park, Portland)