Released from prison in August 2012, Michael Santos describes the difficulties of adapting to the technological development that he missed:

I served more than 25 years in prison, and I haven't yet been free for five full months, so maybe others can understand my ignorance on the subject of technology. I can accept that volumes of basic information are beyond my ability to comprehend right now, but with everything I have to learn, I don't know whether I'll ever grasp all that I need to know. I don't have any idea what a "server" is, and I don't know much about how to make my content available to the people who need it.

He goes on:

I consider myself as having a responsibility, or duty, to help others understand prisons, the people they hold, and strategies for growing through confinement in ways that will help people emerge with values, skills, and resources that translate into success. Technology could really help me succeed, but since I don't understand how to use it effectively, I'm kind of in a lost world.

Mark Whitney praises the accomplishments of Santos, "the first and only prisoner in history to gradually earn his way from a maximum security cell block to a fenceless camp." Santos' personal website here, and a collection of his writings from prison here. Previous Dish on the difficulties of adapting to life outside of prison here.