The Dish Model, Ctd

Mar 13 2013 @ 12:37pm

Vimeo is empowering amateur and independent filmmakers to nix the middlemen to sell their content directly to fans:

[Vimeo On Demand] lets its paying Pro users (a $199 a year service) sell access to their videos to other users. Video creators can set their own price for the video, and then get 90 percent of the revenue, the company says. Other features include the option for video makers to select where exactly they want their video to be available, as well as the design of the page around it. Vimeo previously relied on a “tip jar” for users to pay content owners any amount, though there was no block on viewing the videos. With the new service, you won’t be able to see the work until you’ve paid, just like any other video-on-demand offering.

Notice the 90-10 revenue split. Vimeo’s chief competitor is also trying to get in the game:

YouTube is reportedly planning to start offering subscriptions as an additional monetization vehicle for creators. For now, [Vimeo CEO Kerry] Trainor said, Vimeo isn’t looking at any type of subscription offering: “The feature is targeted toward the creator, and there are no plans for a viewer package.”

Sean Ludwig has more on Vimeo’s new venture, which has several similarities to the new Dish:

What’s so good about the Vimeo paywall is that it’s applicable to all kinds of content, including feature films, short films, TV episodes, and education videos. I mentioned to Trainor during our conversation that I thought the most innovative video distribution was happening from comedians such as Louis C.K. and Aziz Ansari. Both comedians made a lot of cash by offering DRM-free copies of their latest stand-up specials without the hassles. Trainor agreed that comedians generally have been good at online distribution and that Vimeo could be an attractive place for more content like, particularly because it would take care of the hassle of creating a stable distribution platform.

Trainor said Vimeo makes the majority of its revenue from subscriptions, but it also takes in cash from advertising deals and payment transactions. The paywall service falls under the transactions business.

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