Beutler thinks the Republicans’ demands are designed to produce “a bunch of campaign fodder”:

What’s missing [from the GOP’s demands] are the big ticket items they don’t actually want to vote for in a real legislative negotiation. Medicare privatization. Chained CPI. Those didn’t make the cut. Instead, it’s all stuff they want and stuff they know some Democrats have a hard time opposing. If they send a bill like this over to the Senate — there’s reason to believe this bill won’t clear the House — it looks an awful lot like Dems will be able to strip all of the riders using the same majoritarian process they’re currently employing to hive Obamacare defunding off of the government spending bill. That will require asking vulnerable Dems to vote against things that might cause them problems in their states.

Steinglass asks why Republicans taking the economy hostage is more acceptable than Democrats doing so:

If either party can take advantage of this sort of doomsday threat, it should be clear that neither can. To underline that fact, Mr Obama ought to counter the Republican threat not to raise the debt ceiling, with a threat of his own to veto a raise in the debt ceiling. Republicans may demand the postponement of Obamacare in exchange for a debt-ceiling hike. Mr Obama can demand passage of an immigration-reform bill including a path to citizenship in exchange for a debt-ceiling hike. … [T]he whole idea that Mr Obama would threaten to tank America’s credit rating and the global economy in order to achieve his legislative agenda is just nuts. Whereas Republicans, well, you just have to expect them to pull that sort of stunt, because…because why again?