Search Results For: mckibben

The rest of Bill's videos are here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here and here.

In October, Bill spoke to Marlene Spoerri of the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs about his views on nuclear power:

I don't foresee, especially post-Fukushima, a kind of political system in most of the world that would let it happen. Even before Fukushima, it wasn't happening. The reason basically had to do with cost. Environmentalists helped shut down nuclear power, but really it was Wall Street that pulled the plug on it. It's too expensive. It's like burning $20 bills to generate electricity. It requires, if you're going to do it, massive government subsidy. If you're going to apply that subsidy, you're better off doing it with other things that will generate more kilowatt hours per buck.

Now, that said, we should keep trying to figure out if there are some ways to do it that are more acceptable than the ones we've got now. You read about developments on the fringes, Thorium reactors and so on and so forth. But my guess is that in the timeframe we've got this is not going to be the place we go.

Bill's previous videos are here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, and here.

Bill recently wrote in the Washington Post about the Keystone pipeline and taxing carbon:

Those oil barons, certain they will prevail, have kept pouring money into Washington. Just last month, a New York Times profile of a presidential confidante, Anita Dunn, revealed that her lobbying firm was on the Keystone payroll. In other words, in Washington terms, the pipeline is still wired. One oil executive, the morning after Tuesday’s election, was quoted as saying, “We expect it will be approved.”

If that happens, it will mean the president doesn’t understand that his legacy requires dealing with climate change — and that dealing with climate change requires leaving carbon in the ground. There are lots of other actions that will be necessary, too: A serious tax on carbon, for instance, has long been the sine qua non of real progress. But that requires getting House Majority Leader John Boehner and the House Republicans on board. The truth is, we’ve got to do it all, and it will be hard, harder than anything else the administration is considering, since it runs straight up against the richest industry on Earth.

Bill's previous videos are here, here, here, here, here, here, here, and here.Read some of his Sandy-related coverage featured on the Dish here, here and here. His campaign against the fossil fuel industry, Do The Math, is catching fire across the country.

Bill recently spoke with Marc Maximov about the attention we're not paying to the ocean:

The ocean is already 30 percent more acid, and that's causing havoc already with marine creatures. One oceanographer last month at the close of the big conference on ocean acidification in California said that by century's end, at this pace, the oceans of the world will be "hot, sour and breathless." Which seemed to me a pretty powerful statement. Most frozen things will have melted or be in the process of melting. And we'll see a huge increase in severe weather, to the point where my guess would be that civilization will just be a series of emergency responses to things.

Bill's previous videos are here, here, here, here, here, here and here. Read some of his Sandy-related coverage featured on the Dish here, here and here. His campaign against the fossil fuel industry, Do The Math, is catching fire across the country.

Bill recently spoke with Marc Maximov about the most important thing someone can do:

Organize. It's important to change your lightbulb, but it's less important than coming together with other people to try and change the system.

Other things that can help:

[S]olar panels are great. They're highly technical, and they allow you to have a very spread-out, diffuse, democratic power grid. I've got them all over my roof, and they work great even in Vermont. Imagine how well they'd work in North Carolina. But there's lots of other technology, too, that we sometimes forget about when we think about technology. When I was last in Copenhagen for that ridiculous failed climate meeting, the one really good thing was watching the fact that 40 percent of people in that very advanced city have adopted the bicycle as their way of getting to and from work. The bicycle is as technological as the airplane. And probably a lot better for you.

Bill's previous videos are here, here, here, here, here and here. Read some of his Sandy-related coverage featured on the Dish here, here and here. McKibben's campaign against the fossil fuel industry, Do The Math, is catching fire across the country.

Bill recently spoke with Marc Maximov about the subject of species extinction:

I think that the standard scientific assessment, at least for the last seven or eight years, is someplace between 40 and 70 percent of species would go extinct in a rapid warming scenario like the one we're entering. As I recall, that was the IPCC [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change] account of a three-and-a-half-degree rise in temperature. ...

A certain amount of climate change is clearly already baked in, and some of the effects are brutal. You know, this summer we saw the catastrophic melt of the Arctic. We've broken one of the world's biggest physical features. But if we do what we need to do now to get off coal and gas and oil, then we can limit the damage. There's still the possibility of keeping the rise of the planet's temperature below two degrees, which is the line that governments have drawn as the red line. But that would take an all-out, focused, wartime-footing kind of effort, and most of all it would take ending the political power of the fossil fuel industry that's forever delayed change.

Bill's previous videos are here, here, here, here and here. Read some of his Sandy-related coverage featured on the Dish here, here and here. McKibben's campaign against the fossil fuel industry, Do The Math, is catching fire across the country.

In a recent profile of McKibben's post-election plans, Coral Davenport rehashed the Keystone fight:

In 2011, as Washington’s green groups licked their wounds over their failure to push Congress to pass a climate-change bill, McKibben organized thousands of protesters to rally outside the White House against the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, a 1,700-mile conduit for oil from Canada’s tar sands to Gulf Coast refineries.

Hundreds were arrested—including McKibben himself—during the multi-day rallies, in which protesters stood four and five deep as they wound a black plastic “pipeline” around the White House. But it worked—McKibben successfully marshaled President Obama’s political base of young people and environmentalists to send a message to the White House that approving the pipeline would freeze their support for him in 2012. And the Obama administration, which had been on track to approve the pipeline, put the project on ice until after the election—at a cost of frequent pillorying by Republicans.

Soon after, The Boston Globe profiled McKibben in a story headlined “The Man Who Crushed the Keystone Pipeline.” And his influence has grown since then: In July, he wrote a story for Rolling Stone, “Global Warming’s Terrifying New Math,” which went viral and became one of the most widely read and shared stories on the magazine’s website. Now he’s planning his next campaign.

McKibben is currently on a "Do The Math" campaign around the country. Stephen Lacey explains:

Do The Math is modeled after a divestment campaign in the 1980?s that put pressure on American colleges and universities to pull money out of South Africa — a strategy credited with helping put an end to the country’s apartheid system. Environmental groups want to characterize fossil fuel companies in the same way.

“It is high time for us to play offense. These companies have lost their social license,” said McKibben to the crowd. “This is a rogue industry.” Vilifying and boycotting fossil fuel companies is not exactly a new strategy. But this campaign is unique. It’s the first time that any environmental organization has attempted a divestment strategy of this scale. And the targets outlined by McKibben — the actual math in “Do The Math” — creates a very clear case for campaigners when putting pressure on institutions to wind down their investments.

Meanwhile, senators are still pushing for the pipeline. Bill's previous videos are here, here, here and here. Read some of his Sandy-related coverage featured on the Dish here, here and here.

Bill McKibben is one of the world's leading environmentalists and writers:

In 2009, he led the organization of 350.org, which organized what Foreign Policy magazine called "the largest ever global coordinated rally of any kind," with 5,200 simultaneous demonstrations in 181 countries. The magazine named him to its inaugural list of the 100 most important global thinkers, and MSN named him one of the dozen most influential men of 2009.

Bill's previous videos are here, here and here. Read some of his Sandy-related coverage featured on the Dish here, here and here.

Bill McKibben is one of the world's leading environmentalists and writers:

In 2009, he led the organization of 350.org, which organized what Foreign Policy magazine called "the largest ever global coordinated rally of any kind," with 5,200 simultaneous demonstrations in 181 countries. The magazine named him to its inaugural list of the 100 most important global thinkers, and MSN named him one of the dozen most influential men of 2009.

Bill's previous videos are here and here. Read some of his Sandy coverage featured on the Dish here, here and here.

Our feature returns at last:

Bill McKibben is one of the world's leading environmentalists and writers:

In 2009, he led the organization of 350.org, which organized what Foreign Policy magazine called "the largest ever global coordinated rally of any kind," with 5,200 simultaneous demonstrations in 181 countries. The magazine named him to its inaugural list of the 100 most important global thinkers, and MSN named him one of the dozen most influential men of 2009.

Our first video with Bill is here. Read some of his Sandy coverage featured on the Dish here, here and here.