Teaching Through Cheating

Apr 26 2013 @ 10:54am

Peter Nonacs wrote an “insanely hard” test for his UCLA Behavioral Ecology class, but told them they could “cheat,” collaborating and using whatever resources they could find. He explains the reasoning behind this unconventional move:

Once the shock wore off, they got sophisticated. In discussion section, they speculated, organized, and plotted. What would be the test’s payoff matrix? Would cooperation be rewarded or counter-productive? Would a large group work better, or smaller subgroups with specified tasks? What about “scroungers” who didn’t study but were planning to parasitize everyone else’s hard work? How much reciprocity would be demanded in order to share benefits? Was the test going to play out like a dog-eat-dog Hunger Games? In short, the students spent the entire week living Game Theory. It transformed a class where many did not even speak to each other into a coherent whole focused on a single task—beating their crazy professor’s nefarious scheme.