Poverty Crosses The Picket Fence

Andrew Sullivan —  Jan 8 2015 @ 1:26pm

Poor Residents in Cities and Suburbs

In need of more affordable housing, a growing number of poor people are being pushed out of cities and into the suburbs. But as Alena Samuels highlights, the rapid shift is proving complicated for both the newcomers and their adopted communities:

The problem speaks to a different kind of erosion of the American Dream, in which families strive to get to the much-vaunted suburbs, only to find out there’s nothing for them there. And as suburbs see more and more poverty, they become the same traps that impoverished, urban neighborhoods once were, where someone born there has few chances to improve his economic standing.

There are more tangible problems that arise when poverty grows in the suburbs. Often, government structures change more slowly than the population at large, and residents find themselves represented—and policed—by people who don’t understand their needs or concerns. The unrest in Ferguson, a St. Louis suburb, over the past year, reflects this conflict.

Suburbs also have less transit than urban areas, making it difficult for low-income residents to get to jobs or buy groceries. And social services have been slow to follow the poor to the suburbs, so many suburban poor find themselves isolated and without a safety net, hidden from those who might be able to help.